The feeling of watching the Olympics is one of the best feelings in the world. It is a rare opportunity to celebrate and be amazed at what humans can do at their best. Tokyo 2020 is perhaps the most meaningful event this millennium. It is a celebration of our strong fight against COVID-19. During the two world wars, the Olympics took a break. But this time, the Japanese government pushed forward to show their unwavering spirit and make the impossible happen. 

This year, the Olympics will be a little different. Usually, athletes look forward to exploring the host city, trying out the food, and befriending locals. Now, they will be confined to the Olympics Village. 

From the comforts of our homes, we are all witnessing a one-of-a-kind Olympics. It’s a great feeling to hear news channels talking about something inspiring and positive for a change. Tokyo 2020 is filled with stories of human ingenuity. The people behind the scenes were heroes for going out of their way to prepare wonderful experiences for guests amidst adversities. 

Good Food

When Tokyo 2020 was announced, and then Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe donned a Super Mario costume, athletes and enthusiasts started dreaming of strolling the colorful streets and hunting for the best places for ramen and sushi. 

Now, without the option to explore the neon-lighted city, the Olympic Village dining hall bears the challenge of providing a satisfying selection for 18,000 competitors with different diets, cultures, and food preferences.

They have answered the call magnificently. The amount of food provided for visiting athletes is mind-blowing. The selection stretches from Asian, Indian, Mexican, and Italian Cuisine to regional delicacies. Two dining halls offer over 700 menu items, and 48,000 meals are served daily for decorated athletes.

We are getting a glimpse of this exciting menu through the Tik-Tok accounts of some athletes. And so far, we are hearing about the best gyoza in the world and the ramen that you can’t miss out on.

How to Eat Like an Olympian

So, we’re a bit green-eyed over what’s possibly the best international buffet selection in the world. The good news is, even at home, you can eat like an Olympian.

If the best athletes in the world genuinely inspire you, then you can also commit to strict nutritional guidelines to achieve peak performance.

Lynn Grieger, an Arizona-based sports nutritionist, shared some secrets behind the standard Olympian diet.

The three main food groups in a healthy olympian diet include protein, high-quality carbs, and fat. In a nutshell, these include poultry, fish and seafood, beans, lentils, tofu, greek yogurt, nuts, and seeds. The right carbs come with fiber. Fruits and vegetables are carbs. The more color, the better. For fats, it’s essential to include them but to limit them as well. Avocado, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and salmon are good sources of fat.

Michael Phelps Juice Bar Recipes

With 28 medals, Michael Phelps is the most decorated Olympian of all time. He’s not competing this year, but he’s very much on board to cheer on new swimmers. If there’s something Olympic rookies can steal from Phelps, it’s his juice bar recipes that are a great way to start a healthy day. His usual breakfast smoothie is composed of blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, banana, half avocado, and silk. Put them together in a blender and enjoy the morning. Make your own smoothies at home too. 

Good Vibes

Tokyo 2020 has lifted our spirits. Apart from cheering over our homegrown team and envying Japanese food, many lighthearted moments filled the news and social media this week.

Once again, we witnessed Japanese ingenuity. The Japanese people have always given us a lot to admire, from anime that will always have a place in our hearts to technologies that brought us ahead into the future. 

This year, Japan did not disappoint. For a start, Tokyo 2020 medals were made from recycled electronic devices like mobile phones donated by Japanese consumers. More was done to make the games more environment-friendly. The beds in the Olympic village were made from recycled cardboard.

Moreover, some athletes have truly radiant personalities that made our hearts skip during the weeks-long event.

Tom Daley knitting his way through the games is very relatable. Knitting is a great hobby that calms the nerves and reduces anxiety. Being an Olympian is a high-pressure job. We’re glad the British swimmer has found a healthy outlet.

Tik-Tok

Olympians are also dominating Tik-Tok. With no fans to fill the stadium and shout their hearts out, Olympians found a way to connect with the world through social media. No one can miss out on the fun behind the scenes.

This year is a gamechanger and fans are curious about many things. Cody Melphy of the US Rugby team has taken it upon himself to answer questions through Tik-Tok, like how he tries to talk to other athletes. It used to be challenging to reach out to people because of the language barrier. Now, it’s even more complicated because of social distancing protocols. But some intimate moments are seen even between opponents who cheer for each other after the games. After all, one of the biggest virtues of the Olympics is sportsmanship.

There’s also British sprinter Laviai Nielsen poking fun of the daily covid swab test, saying that she’s just having too many. Skaters Rayssa Leal from Brazil and Margie Didal from the Philippines commenced the competition with a Tik-Tok dance.

Finally, if you want a review of Olympic food, head over to the Tik-Tok account of Ilona Maher.